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Science is a topic that covers many areas of research. It is a virtual labyrinth of information to navigate through and without a clue, you can encounter a few myths like the Minotaur from Ancient Greek mythology and get lost in a maze of information.

Open access to the discoveries being made by scientists worldwide is important for anyone wanting to learn more. Being able to read about the research team’s objectives and whether their results support the hypothesis or not is one of those expectations most people have. While an abstract provides a good summary, it doesn’t really provide the in-depth detail readers need to know. 

Image: StockSnap via Pixabay

I have noticed while trawling through online databases, many research papers are published behind a pay wall. And depending on the paper, individuals are expected to pay varying amounts to access the paper. If you are not enrolled at a University or an academic, access to the articles published by many science Journals is not cheap.

But considering scientists are charged a fee to publish their studies through a Journal, I suppose the advantage of global publicity and exposure to a review panel with experience commensurate with the cost, must make sense to researchers keen to share their work. Surprisingly, the latest discoveries aren’t always the most in demand publications in the science world. 

Image: art130405 via Pixabay
Image: art130405 via Pixabay

Take Elementa geometriae by Euclid of Alexandria. It was written approximately 2300 years ago and since then, this ancient manuscript has educated some of the foremost minds in mathematics. An original first edition print from 1482 fetched $148, 842 when it was auctioned in 2016.

But other more popular manuscripts include Newton’s Principia Mathematica attracting an incredible $3.72 million. Basilius Besler’s Hortus Eystettensis was sold for a whopping $2.55 million, and Rheticus’ De Libris Revolutionum earned someone a cool $2.4 million. An original print version of Birds of America by John James Audubon attracted a record $11, 570, 496 USD.

Image: Lubos Houska via Pixabay

A selection of research articles are published under the banner of free, open access content via many Journals and if you have the time, online science magazines provide an interesting perspective on the scientists, their study and research experiences, along with blogs and social media pages dedicated to STEM. 

Earth still has its mysteries – some it can keep to itself – but there are many more exciting things to discover!  The only challenge is open access to the data you need to read. 

Story by Gabrielle Ahern

This latest video produced by Salty Wave for the Institute for Molecular Bioscience, highlights how ongoing pain can impact people’s lives, psychologically, emotionally and physiologically.

Learn more about The Science of Chronic Pain.

Salty Wave has been busy producing a series of Video Explainers for the Institute for Molecular Bioscience at the University of Queensland, Australia.

Take a look at The Science of Acute Pain to understand how pain is felt and experienced by many people.

Montage is a French word and when translated means to edit – to assemble a composite of images, text, music and sounds linked by effects into a condensed presentation of information. The word is formed when Monter ‘to mount’ is combined with -age (a suffix) ‘action or result of something’. If you watch French films or television programs, ‘montage’ in the credit roll refers to the Editor or Post Production team.

Image Maklay62 / Pixabay

Editing is the final piece in the jigsaw puzzle of any film or video and is one of the most important aspects of any production.

To achieve the final cut, editors work from a script, and edit together vision, narration, effects, graphics, text, music and natural sound into a logical sequence. Editors use their creative and technical expertise to produce the final presentation, and styles of editing are applied to convey atmosphere, pace and excitement, suspense, humour or mystery. 

Image Maklay62 / Pixabay

In film, different specialists contribute to postproduction. For example, visual effects designers, continuity, animators, sound engineers, musical composers, the director and producers. But the number of people involved also depends on the type of production and the budget. On average, one editor edits all aspects of a television program (30 minutes to over an hour in duration), and a sound editor will complete the final sound mix before broadcast.

Image by Maklay62 / Pixabay

In documentary production, one person can wear all the production caps and be the cinematographer, sound recorder, writer, presenter and editor. While in commercials, independent producers liaise with the client to complete different types of presentations.  

There is a lot to consider when editing a video and software packages often touted as simple to use, can spring a few traps for the unwary digital traveller.

Image Pexels / Pixabay

I specialise in postproduction and if you are planning to include a surf-safari video, wildlife documentary, small biz promo, cinema commercial or video explainer for business or social ventures, I invite you to contact me at Salty Wave.

Making a few discoveries is an exciting experience for anyone, especially encountering mega marine wildlife while on a diving holiday. The Dive in Australia crew organise trips for those who want to experience sharks, whales, manta rays, whale sharks, turtles and many more animals around Australia and overseas – up close.

Here is the new video I produced – showcasing some of the excitement waiting for anyone looking for adventure by scuba diving off the coast of Kavieng in Papua New Guinea!

Explore more here.

Photograph by Steve Brady

There are many ways to present a story about your business or the interests you pursue. A video can be a positive ally when attempting to achieve the ultimate goal – gaining the trust of new customers.

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Photo via Pixabay – 5688709

No matter the makeup of the business, a sole trader or a team of people, each has an interesting tale about its origins or a philosophy it likes to follow, so consider the type of video that is representative of your public identity.

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Photo via Pixabay – Stocksnap

A commercial to advertise products; an explainer video to demonstrate expertise; or a simple video introducing others to what the business is all about, clothing, tourism, hospitality, sport or a trade – the list is endless – makes a big difference to the decision an individual makes.

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Photo via Pixabay – Rawpixel

A video is not just an introduction, it is also a valuable method of making people more aware of what your business offers and who the people are behind the website or shop front. You never know, a new customer might just be around the corner. But they don’t know about your service, until they know more about you.

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Photo via Pixabay – B_Me

Make video your story and connect with Gabrielle Ahern at Salty Wave to discuss the video right for your business via www.saltywave.com.au

 

Stories need to be told

Souvenir to take with you

If you are thinking about content creation, there are a few options like images, videos, articles, podcasts, slide shares, infographics, and newsletters. There are a lot of ways to catch attention, but once you know what you want to say and who your audience is, it is easy to find the right path to follow.

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Photo by Pexels

Snapping a photograph or creating an infographic about a product or service on offer are two of the top methods of attracting potential buyers attention. The quality of the image and the way it is framed alongside the description offers great potential. Some people think it is timing that makes the difference but then, most people are at work during the day or night so the way the image is presented can capture someone’s attention at any time. I scroll through Facebook, Flickr, Instagram or Pinterest before I go to sleep or when I am having a break. So timing is not everything for everyone but the quality is.

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Photo by Ayoub Wardin

A video or slide share is a fantastic means of attracting attention because a lot of people prefer to watch an interesting clip that demonstrates exactly what they can expect from your small biz. You might be a hairdresser with a hip clientele in the valley and you want to create an online space to share discounts on haircuts or advertise hair care products. The same thing goes if you are selling your homeware designs, regular posts about your products will attract a lot of interest if you show people where you take inspiration from and how you turn your ideas into beautiful pieces for the home or office.

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Photo by Tookapic

Another effective avenue is producing a podcast series. The spoken word can do so much for your business! Just think how many times you have listened to the radio and downloaded the song you just heard because it really spoke to you on so many levels. Podcasts give you that same stage, except you’re the ‘singer’ and the ‘song’ might be the service you offer in perhaps architecture or landscaping. If someone thinks your expertise is what they need, they’ll contact you straight away. Not everyone can design a home or create a beautiful green space to relax in.

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Photo by Daniel Friesenecker

An article or newsletter introduces people to who you are and what you can do for them. You can share your expertise about many topics based on your qualifications or professional experience. It might be you are a traveler making your way around the world but your real career is in travel gear and equipment. You can trial the gear you sell while on the road and tell prospective customers what it’s like to use. People are always investigating what they need for their next vacation, so articles posted on your blog site are an awesome way to attract business to your door.

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Photo by Yongxinz

So when thinking about where you are and where you want to go with your business, think about content creation and contact Gabrielle Ahern to discuss what is good for you and which way to go!

Written by Gabrielle Ahern, Salty Wave, http://www.saltywave.com.au

Each week I trawl through a sea of information from social media, television programs, podcasts, films, magazines, science research and newspapers. Sometimes I feel inspired creatively, not inspired in any way, shape or form, or compelled to move out of my comfort zone. A couple of weeks ago, I decided to redesign my Salty Wave website to highlight the products and services I offer in postproduction, content strategy and photography. As a result of my efforts, the website has transitioned into a slick presentation and I feel great about making the decision to change things up.

There are links to my social media channels announcing what’s happening at Salty Wave, ecology themed articles featuring the latest science discoveries, videos covering different topics and reports about innovative technologies making the human footprint more wearable by nature. The projects I am managing are very interesting and there will be more updates to follow soon. So follow Salty Wave via Twitter, Google, Facebook, Instagram and lots of other channels and keep up with what’s going on.

I am very excited to announce the new website I designed for Salty Wave.

Researchers pursue different specialisations in science and many are like modern day explorers, making discoveries that are improving our every day lives. I am currently contracted by the Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, to write projects.

Reading about the work of the Institute is really inspiring for anyone who wants to be a scientist or there already, because finding out what nature has to offer can be captivating but dangerous at the same time. It is a fantastic experience to learn about their research achievements. Watch this space for more news and information very soon.

Being a marine biologist, it is natural to love the ocean. Not just to take a photo, go surfing, swimming or catch a fish. I really throw myself into the deep end and search for the most interesting topics I can find to write about, especially those that not many people in the community know about.

An opportunity to write a story based on the experiences of professional diver, Steve Brady owner of Dive In Australia came along and my conversations with him highlighted just how special marine wildlife encounters are for many people.

Steve has captured some memorable moments during a recent ocean adventure and he asked me to produce a video about the dive location. I am just amazed by the vision and you’ll want to go there. More news to follow soon!

Earlier this year, I began my part-time role as Managing Community Editor for the npj Science of Learning Community, allied with the Queensland Brain Institute at The University of Queensland. Nature Research originally initiated the venture, which is an offshoot of npj Science of Learning, a journal dedicated to understanding learning at a range of levels, from neuroscience to psychology to education.

I have made the acquaintance of an exciting range of professionals whose knowledge and expertise varies across specialisations. The art of knowing what to publish to the Community is only challenged by the weight of research available. But this alone has made my role extremely enjoyable and rewarding, as I have gathered a lot of information and made new connections along the way. With so much to explore, I discovered another persons perspective can turn a traditional concept on its head overnight and change up the way science research is conducted for good. It is a real privilege to be in such a pivotal role that assists academic professionals share their research findings and knowledge with the rest of the world.

Please take a look at the npj Science of Learning Community for some interesting discoveries, insights and expertise about how the human brain is designed to learn throughout life, the teachers who put theory into practice in class, the people who study the way we perceive and interact with the world and the scientists who are piecing together the evolutionary puzzle of human intelligence.